Architect Magazine

Architect Magazine

Hard Science Gives Rise to Soft Machines

The development of sensory skins and wearable technology is causing researchers to re-evaluate the nature of these charged, data-collecting electronic systems. In a 2007 interview, Akira Wakita, a wearable computing and robotics expert and a professor in the environment and information studies department at Keio University in Japan, described a future for soft—rather than hard—interfaces. "Nowadays, most products are rigid,” he said. "However, the use of soft, elastic shells may be another solution—and closer to the nature of the human body itself. So, I like to think about the skin of the product, which may be another means of conveying the electricity in wearable computing.”

//My interview appeared in the article targeting on the ability of soft machines.


Hard Science Gives Rise to Soft Machines

The development of sensory skins and wearable technology is causing researchers to re-evaluate the nature of these charged, data-collecting electronic systems. In a 2007 interview, Akira Wakita, a wearable computing and robotics expert and a professor in the environment and information studies department at Keio University in Japan, described a future for soft—rather than hard—interfaces. "Nowadays, most products are rigid,” he said. "However, the use of soft, elastic shells may be another solution—and closer to the nature of the human body itself. So, I like to think about the skin of the product, which may be another means of conveying the electricity in wearable computing.”

//柔らかい機械(Soft Machines)の可能性をテーマにした記事に私のインタビューが掲載されています。